Hooked on Trivial Pursuit online – Why are games so addictive on the net?

Seriously, why are games so addictive on computers and/or over the Internet? I’m even hooked on an online version of Trivial Pursuit now! http://free-games-list.blogspot.com/2011/03/trivial-pursuit-free-online-game-six.html

Trivial Pursuit online in a web version

Trivial Pursuit online in a web version



Have either of you ever played that particular version of Trivial Pursuit? I ask, not because of any weird rules or particularly tough questions in it, but because of the opponent – The Teddybear… Well, the teddy bear and it’s moves more precisely.
Who put that in there? Funny as hell though, and maybe that’s why I’ve become addicted to this game?

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Audi Carbon Ski coming in 2011/2012

Does these skis look great or what? Seems that Audi is going to start production of a carbon fiber ski later this year, possibly in some sort of partnership with Head. Supposed to be both light weight and strong; all ski enthusiasts will be waiting eagerly for this one by Audi.

The Audi Carbon Ski Concept on Carbon Cover

The Audi Carbon Ski Concept on Carbon Cover

The Audi Carbon Ski Concept Illustration

The Audi Carbon Ski Concept Illustration

Don’t know anything about the price yet though. Read full article here: The Audi Carbon Ski Concept 

Mammoth cloning possible in 4 years – Mammoth babies coming

The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years because of bored self-involved scientists looking for something to do that will make them rich and famous.

Mammoth cloning possible in 4 years

Mammoth cloning possible in 4 years

Previous efforts in the 1990s to recover nuclei in cells from the skin and muscle tissue from mammoths found in the Siberian permafrost failed because they had been too badly damaged by the extreme cold.

But a technique pioneered in 2008 by Dr. Teruhiko Wakayama, of the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, was successful in cloning a mouse from the cells of another mouse that had been frozen for 16 years.

Now that hurdle has been overcome, Akira Iritani, a professor at Kyoto University, is reactivating his campaign to resurrect the species that died out 5,000 years ago.

“Now the technical problems have been overcome, all we need is a good sample of soft tissue from a frozen mammoth,” he told The Daily Telegraph.

He intends to use Dr Wakayama’s technique to identify the nuclei of viable mammoth cells before extracting the healthy ones.

The nuclei will then be inserted into the egg cells of an African elephant, which will act as the surrogate mother for the mammoth.

Professor Iritani said he estimates that another two years will be needed before the elephant can be impregnated, followed by the approximately 600-day gestation period.

He has announced plans to travel to Siberia in the summer to search for mammoths in the permafrost and to recover a sample of skin or tissue that can be as small as 3cm square. If he is unsuccessful, the professor said, he will ask Russian scientists to provide a sample from one of their finds.

“The success rate in the cloning of cattle was poor until recently but now stands at about 30 per cent,” he said. “I think we have a reasonable chance of success and a healthy mammoth could be born in four or five years.”