Breast augmentation on strangers in streets with Boob Job app for iPhone

BoobJob app for iPhone smartphone with breast augmentation

Boob Job app for iPhone smartphone with breast augmentation

Breast augmentation is expensive and time-consuming — and can’t just be done to strangers on the street. So what are you supposed to do if you really want to see how someone would look with a slightly larger chest? Reach for your iPhone, of course!

 

With an iPhone app appropriately named Boob Job you can give anyone a little lift and boost.

All you need to do is install the app — you can get it from the Apple App Store for a dollar — and find or take a photo of your lucky patient. Then you’ll just swipe, drag, and pinch your fingers against your iPhone’s screen a few times and — tada! — breast augmentation surgery complete.

I decided to try out the app on fellow blogger Whitson Gordon who — while clever and delightfully witty — isn’t exactly in possession of breasts that would make Pamela Anderson envious. I snatched a photo off his Facebook page, opened it in the Boob Job app, dragged some circles onto his chest, and resized them appropriately. Then I tapped some vaguely marked buttons on the next screen to increase the selected parts and add a little highlight along the newly created curves.

You can see Whitson’s pre-virtual-surgery and post-virtual-surgery photos above. The final result won’t tempt any Victoria’s Secret modeling scouts, but it makes for a great laugh.

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Cloned iPad from China for half the price?! The $249 iPad

Cloned iPad for 50% of the regular price of an iPad

A $249 iPad? Cloned iPad for 50% of the regular price of an iPad

This proposition seems interesting: A cloned iPad for 50% off the price of a regular iPad. That’s $249 for a fully functional iPad. I can’t wait.

Tablet launch, earnings mean big week for Apple

The company releases quarterly results on Monday, but Wall Street is waiting for Wednesday, when Apple could unveil a new tablet computer that investors hope will be as huge a phenomenon as its iconic iPod and iPhone.

The week could provide a pair of long-term catalysts for Apple’s stock. But the company’s shares often sell off right after major launches after months of rumor fuel big expectations.

Little is known about the device, despite a rabid fan following speculating on everything from the component makers to its shape and form. Industry watchers are bullish. They say Apple’s obsession to detail gives the so-called “iSlate” a big edge in a computer category that had been deemed a failure.

“If Apple is going to design a product, then it’s going to be the best design in the marketplace,” said Broadpoint Amtech analyst Brian Marshall. “To bet that it’s going to be a flop is a bad bet.”

Most analysts have not factored the tablet into estimates for fiscal 2010, but sell-siders have been busy lifting price targets on Apple’s stock in the past month.

To be sure, Apple is setting itself quite a task, one that has frustrated previous attempts: to sell consumers on the value of a device that sits somewhere between a full-sized laptop and a pocket cellphone.

The device is hyped as a do-everything, go-everywhere touchscreen media gadget that bridges the gap between smartphones, laptops and electronic readers. Magazine, book and newspaper publishers are reportedly talking with Apple about providing material.

“There’s a huge potential long-term story there for Apple,” said Atlantic Equities analyst James Cordwell. “Whether they get it right the first time, we’ll have to wait and see, but they have a pretty good track record.”

IF THE PRICE IS RIGHT

Wall Street will pay particular attention to the tablet’s price tag. If it is closer to $1,000 than $600, analysts say it will be tougher to convince consumers to buy.

Apple could offer it under carrier-subsidized plans — Verizon Wireless is frequently mentioned — which might help take the bite out of the purchase price.

Apple Q4 2009 Analyst Coverage, Steve Jobs

Analysts believe Apple will sell 2 million to 5 million tablets in the first year.

The device could add $1 per share to Apple’s non-GAAP earnings in the year, and generate $2.8 billion to $3.5 billion of revenue, with a $700 average selling price, said Cross research analyst Shannon Cross.

Its Monday earnings run-down will serve as a warm-up for the tablet launch. Strong iPhone sales and continued momentum from its Mac computers should fuel the results.

Given Apple’s recent tradition of shredding Wall Street’s estimates, investors will expect nothing less than a strong beat when it reports fiscal first-quarter results. The company is trading at around 27 times forward earnings.

Apple has bested Wall Street EPS targets by at least 15 percent in the past four quarters, and analyst sentiment on the company is trending upward, according to data compiled by Thomson Reuters StarMine.

According to StarMine’s SmartEstimate, which places more weight on recent forecasts by top-rated analysts, Apple should post EPS of $2.11 a share on revenue of $12.16 billion

“It really boils down to one point, is their beat big enough?” said Jessup & Lamont analyst Kevin Dede. “If you’re long, just ride this one out, but if you’re a hedge fund, maybe you want to think twice.”

Apple’s shares have risen around 9 percent since mid-December when hype about the tablet quickened, and are trading a few dollars shy of an all-time high. It is now the fourth largest stock on the S&P500 index, outranking the likes of IBM and JPMorgan Chase.

Some investors will be reluctant to sell shares ahead of the tablet unveiling two days later, Dede said.

Apple is expected to report earnings of $2.06 a share on revenue of $12.05 billion, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S, with a gross margin of 35.7 percent.

Marshall, whose estimates are well above consensus, expects Apple to deliver a strong upside surprise.

“The beat is going to be significant enough that we’ll have a material earnings revisions for calendar year 2010,” Marshall said.

The iPhone should provide a boost for Apple in the holiday quarter, particularly internationally, he said. Marshal predicted that iPhone units sold will surpass the 9 million average estimate.

Analysts target Mac shipments of around 3 million for the quarter. Mac shipments in the United States jumped 31 percent in the quarter, according to research group IDC.

Google Maps shows Flu and H1N1 vaccine spots across USA

http://maps.google.com/maps/mpl?moduleurl=http://maps.google.com/mapfiles/mapplets/flushot/flushot.xml

Get your vaccine for free now and you may stay alive over the winter.

First iPhone worm/virus with Rick Astley

Worm attack at Apples iPhone.
The first worm to infect the Apple iPhone has been discovered spreading “in the wild” in Australia.

The self-propagating program changes the phone’s wallpaper to a picture of 80s singer Rick Astley with the message “ikee is never going to give you up”.

iPhone virus worm Rick Astley
iPhone virus worm Rick Astley

The worm, known as ikee, only affects “jail-broken” phones, where a user has removed Apple’s protection mechanisms to allow the phone to run any software.

Experts say the worm is not harmful but more malicious variants could follow.

“The creator of the worm has released full source code of the four existing variants of this worm,” wrote Mikko Hypponen of security firm F-secure.

“This means that there will quickly be more variants, and they might have nastier payload than just changing your wallpaper.”

The picture of Rick Astley is believed to be a nod to the internet phenomenon known as Rickrolling, where web users are tricked into clicking on what they believe is a relevant link, only to find that it actually takes the user to a video of the pop star’s song “Never gonna give you up”.

Sounds like bad news!

 

Charlie Brooker quote on Windows OS.

“I know Windows is awful. Everyone knows Windows is awful. Windows is like the faint smell of piss in a subway: it’s there, and there’s nothing you can do about it.” – Charlie Brooker
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/sep/28/charlie-brooker-microsoft-mac-windows