Japan down 10%, World markets all down – But solar power bucks the trend!

Radioactive contamination testing of Japanese

Radioactive contamination testing of Japanese

What a day on the stock exchanges around the world.
Nikkei down over 10% on Tuesday. 10%! And Nikkei did extremly poorly on Monday as well. Poor Japan, I hope they will be spared of more misery now and that damages can be mended effectively. It is comforting to see the international support for Japan.

Back to the stock exchanges however, one can’t help but notice that solar stocks have skyrocketed the last two days.
While the world markets have been down two days in a row, solar stocks have bucked the trend and skyrocketed as much as 20% in two days. And the momentum keeps building up.
The worlds largest producers of solar panels, Suntech Power and Yingli Green have shot through the roof today, with Yingli Green up from 10.50 on Friday to 12.25 today, Tuesday. 
 
Yingli Green solar power company stock chart after the Japanese earthquake and tsunami

Yingli Green solar power company stock chart after the Japanese earthquake and tsunami


Solar stocks have been upgraded, nuclear power companies, such as Hitachi, that built the nuclear reactors in Japan have been hammered and downgraded, and even oil companies are being downgraded at the time of this writing.
Could this finally become the moment for solar companies to shine, not just economically as they already have over the last few years, but shine with a solid position ideologically and become immune to political instability from now on?

Solar Power Forum with News.

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Top 20 Blogs of 2010

The Blogosphere is still going strong, with lots of interesting information and inside scoops coming from all corners of the world every day. With the iPad release just around the corner, the Apple Insider and iPadblogs are more popular than ever.
For art lovers there is the increasingly popular
BibliOdyssey and the less knownFlickr blogfor photo lovers.

Environmental blogs are of course a must this year, with Solar Power Forum and Eco Geekpaving the way before the much awaited Chevrolet Volt. Of course, other car manufacturers have hybrids and electric cars coming out this year too, according to rumors from the auto blogs of Audi Rumors, Mercedes Rumors, and BMW Rumors.
There are plenty of rumors on other technology fronts too, such as with
Chinese Clones of everything from iPhone to iPad, even though Chinese tablets have been released before the iPad.

Major events this year one can follow through blogs are of course the FIFA 2010 WORLD CUP and EUROVISION 2010. Not to mention the continued popularity of the Twilight Saga on blogs such as Breaking Dawn, Bella Cullen, Eclipse, Edward Cullen, and Werewolf Jacob.
Oh and I hear
Perez Hilton is still a popular blog, and that Felix’s Babes will be.

Obama will visits the Copenhagen climate conference

December 5, 2009
Obama Shifts His Visit to Last Day of Climate Conference
By JOHN M. BRODER
WASHINGTON — Citing progress on many issues, the White House said Friday that President Obama had shifted the date he would appear at the United Nations climate change conference in Copenhagen to Dec. 18, the last scheduled day.

In a written statement, it said the president believed that he could have a more decisive impact by appearing at the end of the 12-day conference, when as many as 100 other heads of state are scheduled to show up, rather than next Wednesday as originally planned.

The original date was timed to coincide with the president’s trip to Oslo on Thursday to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Administration officials still acknowledge that the meeting in Denmark will not produce a binding international treaty, as had earlier been hoped, but rather an interim political deal and a promise to reconvene next year to work toward a formal treaty. The White House said it believed that it was still possible to conclude a “meaningful Copenhagen accord” in which all countries pledged to take immediate action to address climate change.

In the past two weeks, the United States, China and India have all announced targets for reducing their emissions of greenhouse gases.

The White House said Mr. Obama had discussed the matter this week with the leaders of France, Britain, Australia and Germany. Many world leaders and environmental advocates had been urging the president to attend later in the conference as a symbol of his commitment to a successful outcome.

“Based on his conversations with other leaders and the progress that has already been made to give momentum to negotiations, the president believes that continued U.S. leadership can be most productive through his participation at the end of the Copenhagen conference on Dec. 18 rather than on Dec. 9,” the White House statement said.

“There are still outstanding issues that must be negotiated for an agreement to be reached, but this decision reflects the president’s commitment to doing all that he can to pursue a positive outcome,” the statement added.

Among the issues still under consideration is a “fast-start” fund of roughly $10 billion to be financed by wealthy nations to help poorer nations adapt to a changing climate and convert to less-polluting forms of energy. There is no agreement yet on how the fund should be structured and who should pay into it, but it is clear that this is one area in which Mr. Obama thinks he can be useful.

“The United States will pay its fair share of that amount and other countries will make substantial commitments as well,” the White House said. “In Copenhagen, we also need to address the need for financing in the longer term to support adaptation and mitigation in developing countries.

“Providing this assistance is not only a humanitarian imperative — it’s an investment in our common security, as no climate change accord can succeed if it does not help all countries reduce their emissions,” the statement said.

‘Show Your Working’: What ‘ClimateGate’ means

BEFORE COPENHAGEN

The “ClimateGate” affair – the publication of e-mails and documents hacked or leaked from one of the world’s leading climate research institutions – is being intensely debated on the web. But what does it imply for climate science? Here, Mike Hulme and Jerome Ravetz say it shows that we need a more concerted effort to explain and engage the public in understanding the processes and practices of science and scientists.

“ Practising scientists know that they do not simply follow a rulebook to do their science, otherwise it could be done by a robot ”

As the repercussions of

reverberate around the virtual community of global citizens, we believe it is both important and urgent to reflect on what this moment is telling us about the practice of science in the 21st Century.
In particular, what is it telling us about the social status and perceived authority of scientific claims about climate change?

We argue that the evolving practice of science in the contemporary world must be different from the classic view of disinterested – almost robotic – humans establishing objective claims to universal truth.

Climate change policies are claimed to be grounded in scientific knowledge about physical cause and effect and about reliable projections of the future.

As opposed to other ways of knowing the world around us – through intuition, inherited belief, myth – such scientific knowledge retains its authority by widespread trust in science’s reassuring norms of objectivity, universality and disinterestedness.

These perceived norms work to guarantee to the public trustworthy scientific knowledge, and allow such knowledge to claim high authority in political deliberation and argumentation; this, at least, is what historically has been argued in the case of climate change.

What distinguishes science from other forms of knowledge?

On what basis does scientific knowledge earn its high status and authority?

What are the minimum standards of scientific practice that ensure it is trustworthy?

For an open, enquiring and participative society, these are questions that have become much more important in the wake of ClimateGate.

They are also questions that scientists should continually be asking of themselves as the political and cultural worlds within which they do their work rapidly change.

Doing science in 2010 demands something rather different from scientists than did science in 1960, or even in 1985.

How science has evolved

The understanding of science as a social activity has changed quite radically in the last 50 years.

The classic virtues of scientific objectivity, universality and disinterestedness can no longer be claimed to be automatically effective as the essential properties of scientific knowledge.

Instead, warranted knowledge – knowledge that is authoritative, reliable and guaranteed on the basis of how it has been acquired – has become more sought after than the ideal of some ultimately true and objective knowledge.

“ The public… may not be able to describe fluid dynamics using mathematics, but they can recognise evasiveness when they see it ”

Warranted knowledge places great weight on ensuring that the authenticating roles of socially-agreed norms and practices in science are adequately fulfilled – what in other fields is called quality assurance.

And science earns its status in society from strict adherence to such norms.

For climate change, this may mean the adequate operation of professional peer review, the sharing of empirical data, the open acknowledgement of errors, and openness about one’s funders.

Crucially, the idea of warranted knowledge also recognises that these internal norms and practices will change over time in response to external changes in political culture, science funding and communication technologies.

In certain areas of research – and climate change is certainly one of these – the authenticating of scientific knowledge now demands two further things: an engagement with expertise outside the laboratory, and responsiveness to the natural scepticism and desire for scrutiny of an educated public.

The public may not be able to follow radiation physics, but they can follow an argument; they may not be able to describe fluid dynamics using mathematics, but they can recognise evasiveness when they see it.

Where claims of scientific knowledge provide the basis of significant public policy, demands for what has been called “extended peer review” and “the democratisation of science” become overwhelming.

Extended peer review is an idea that can take many forms.

It may mean the involvement of a wider range of professionals than just scientists.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), for example, included individuals from industry, environmental organisations and government officials as peer reviewers of early drafts of their assessments.

More radically, some have suggested that opening up expert knowledge to the scrutiny of the wider public is also warranted.

While there will always be a unique function for expert scientific reviewers to play in authenticating knowledge, this need not exclude other interested and motivated citizens from being active.

These demands for more openness in science are intensified by the embedding of the internet and Web 2.0 media as central features of many people’s social exchanges.

It is no longer tenable to believe that warranted and trusted scientific knowledge can come into existence inside laboratories that are hermetically sealed from such demands.

A revolution in science

So we have a three-fold revolution in the demands that are placed on scientific knowledge claims as they apply to investigations such as climate change:

To be warranted, knowledge must emerge from a respectful process in which science’s own internal social norms and practices are adhered to
To be validated, knowledge must also be subject to the scrutiny of an extended community of citizens who have legitimate stakes in the significance of what is being claimed
And to be empowered for use in public deliberation and policy-making, knowledge must be fully exposed to the proliferating new communication media by which such extended peer scrutiny takes place.
The opportunity that lies at the centre of these more open practices of science is to secure the gold standard of trust.

And it is public trust in climate change science that has potentially been damaged as a result of the exposure of e-mails between researchers at the University of East Anglia’s Climatic Research Unit (CRU) and their peers elsewhere.

The disclosure and content of these private exchanges is only the latest in a long line of instances that point to the need for major changes in the relationship between science and the public.

By this, we mean a more concerted effort to explain and engage the public in understanding the processes and practices of science and scientists, as much as explaining the substance of their knowledge and how (un)certain it is.

How well does the public understand professional peer review, for example, or the role of a workshop, a seminar and a conference in science?

Does the public understand how scientists go about resolving differences of opinion or reaching consensus about an important question when the uncertainties are large?

We don’t mean the “textbook” answers to such things; all practising scientists know that they do not simply follow a rulebook to do their science, otherwise it could be done by a robot.

Science is a deeply human activity, and we need to be more honest about what this entails. Rather than undermining science, it would actually allow the public to place their trust more appropriately in the various types of knowledge that scientists can offer.

What should be done?

At the very least, the publication of private CRU e-mail correspondence should be seen as a wake-up call for scientists – and especially for climate scientists.

The key lesson to be learnt is that not only must scientific knowledge about climate change be publicly owned – the IPCC does a fair job of this according to its own terms – but that in the new century of digital communication and an active citizenry, the very practices of scientific enquiry must also be publicly owned.

Unsettling as this may be for scientists, the combination of “post-normal science” and an internet-driven democratisation of knowledge demands a new professional and public ethos in science.

And there is no better place to start this revolution than with climate science.

After all, it is claimed, there is no more pressing global political challenge than this.

But might this episode signify something more in the unfolding story of climate change – maybe the start of a process of re-structuring scientific knowledge?

It is possible that some areas of climate science have become sclerotic, that its scientific practices have become too partisan, that its funding – whether from private or public sectors – has compromised scientists.

The tribalism that some of the e-mails reveal suggests a form of social organisation that is now all too familiar in some sections of business and government.

Public trust in science, which was damaged in the BSE scandal 13 years ago, risks being affected by this latest episode.

A Citizen’s Panel on Climate Change (CPCC)?

It is also possible that the institutional innovation that has been the IPCC has now largely run its course.

Perhaps, through its structural tendency to politicise climate change science, it has helped to foster a more authoritarian and exclusive form of knowledge production – just at a time when a globalising and wired cosmopolitan culture is demanding of science something much more open and inclusive.

The IPCC was designed by the UN in the Cold War era, before the internet and before GoogleWave.

Maybe we should think about how a Citizen’s Panel on Climate Change might work in today’s world, as well as a less centralising series of IPCC-like expert assessments.

If there are serious ecological and social issues to be attended to because of the way the world’s climates are changing – as the authors of this article believe – then scientists need to take a long hard look at how they are creating, validating and mobilising scientific knowledge about climate change.

Climate science alters the way we think about humanity and its possible futures.

It is not the case that the science is somehow now “finished” and that we now should simply get on with implementing it.

We have decades ahead when there will be interplay between evolving scientific knowledge with persisting uncertainty and ignorance, new ways of understanding our place in the world, and new ways of being in it.

A more open and a better understood science process will mean more trusted science, and will increase the chances of both “good science” and “good policy”.

“Show your working” is the imperative given to scientists when preparing for publication to peers.

There, it refers to techniques.

Now, with the public as partner in the creation and implementation of scientific knowledge in the policy domain, the injunction has a new and enhanced meaning.

Mike Hulme is professor of climate change in the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia, and author of Why We Disagree About Climate Change

Dr Jerome Ravetz is an independent scholar affiliated to the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS) at Oxford University

‘Sperminator’ gets 12 Facebook chicks pregnant!

U.K. lowers the standards yet again. 

Dominic Baronet Facebook's 'Sperminator' and his 12 Pregnant Idiots

Dominic Baronet Facebook's 'Sperminator' and his 12 Pregnant Idiots

“GIRLS beware! If grinning charmer Dominic Baronet is your Facebook friend delete him NOW – or he’ll have you PREGNANT in a just a few clicks.
Love rat Baronet has been branded The Sperminator for getting TWELVE girls pregnant after wooing them on the social networking site – two of them on the SAME DAY.

Five women are now raising his KIDS, five were talked into ABORTIONS and two are EXPECTING.
For years the laptop lust hunter has secretly preyed on women with his smooth internet patter. He told one smitten girl: “One hundred million sperm entered the womb. Only one made you – that makes you simply the best!”

As well as his wantonly prolific bedroom strike rate, 26-year-old factory worker Baronet boasts a seedy history – a convicted drug dealer sentenced to four years for supplying cocaine and ecstasy. Just the sort of lad you want fathering your babies.
Now, after discovering the truth, one of his most recent conquests patted her four-month bump and demanded he be forced to have THE SNIP.

Angry Kerry Martin, 24, told us: “Dominic should have a danger warning slapped on his Facbook page and be given a compulsory vasectomy to protect other girls.”
Kerry uncovered Baronet’s cheating ways by keeping tabs on his page after he ditched her. In no time she spotted a congratulations message revealing he’d also got 24-year-old Stacy Jones pregnant around the same time…”

Read the rest and weep (for the future of mankind)

Norwegians left humiliated – World in shock! It’s Nobel Peace Prize 2009

The reactions to the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to Barack Obama were what you would expect.


President Obama in conversations
Norwegians have been left feeling humiliated by the incompetance and disrespect of the ideals of Alfred Nobel’s will as managed by the Nobel Peace committee, and the tarnished reputation left by their decisions. Not the first time, but it’s been a while since the politics and incompetance was this obvious even to the dumbest person in the room.

In a matter of hours, Norway has become the target of a lot of well placed jokes about it’s perception of reality. However, for the time being, it appears that the majority of Norwegians joins in on the criticism of the committee.

Here are some of the reactions to the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize from around the world:
– “If Obama deserves the Noble Peace Prize then so does every Miss America contestant who babbles about world peace.”

– “The title is worth nothing, because Obama took office less than 10 days before the Feb. 1 deadline for Nobel Prize nominations.”

– “I have only heard his speech [in Cairo]. I have seen nothing apart from that, just promises. I don’t think it’s enough, yet. But if he completes the withdrawal of the Americans and we completely get rid of their presence in the Middle East, then all Iraqis will thank Obama and trust America again. Then he will deserve not only the Nobel prize, but every other peace accolade the world has to offer. If he really wants to work for peace, tell him to continue working for it in Iraq.”

– “Yes. He’s Got the Prize. Now he should earn it.”

– “I bet Kim Jong Il is shaking with jealous rage in his platform shoes. He hasn’t bombed anyone and he didn’t get a look in.”

– “I wonder what the 6 children killed in a NATO attack in Afghanistan last week has to say about this? Oh wait… They can’t. Cause they’ve been bombed by the peace effort!”

– “The Nobel Prize just won the award for best overall award.”

– “I think they should give Obama a Grammy too.”

– “I think they should give Obama an Oscar too.”

– “If you listen real hard you can hear the moon crying today.”

– “To be honest, I do not feel that I deserve to be in the company of so many of the transformative figures who’ve been honored by this prize — men and women who’ve inspired me and inspired the entire world through their courageous pursuit of peace… 
…I know that throughout history, the Nobel Peace Prize has not just been used to honor specific achievement; it’s also been used as a means to give momentum to a set of causes.  And that is why I will accept this award as a call to action — a call for all nations to confront the common challenges of the 21st century.” – US President Barack Obama

Thorbjørn Jagland of the Nobel committee said something too, and we WILL post his comments too, as soon as we can find anyone that understands his English.

Will this award tie Obama to his goals and aspirations and strengthen his efforts and belief, or will it become a burden on him and for him?
Did Obama deserve it? Should he accept it? Will he change his mind?
Vote here

People are already asking themselves who will be awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize.
The odds seem heavily in favour of the Nobel Committee itself. But, if you think this is a new and original joke, Norwegians have already cracked jokes about this for more than 30 years, ever since Knut Aunbu and Johnny Bergh wrote the comedy “To Norway, Home of Giants” in 1979.

(Fast forward to 7:42 in Part 2, if you only want to watch the Nobel Peace Committee sketch.)

What now?
Just like every year, Geir Lundestad of the Nobel committee, one of the most arrogant and self-righteous people in Norway will tell Norwegians how stupid they are, and how none of them have his high intellectual capacity required to understand any of this.
Torbjørn Jageland meanwhile will try to learn to speak English in the 2 months before the Norwegian Oscars. (Good luck. You will need it! Really, really need it!)

The establishment will sleep peacefully tonight.
See you at the establishment awards (Great! There blows the whole Oslo Police budget for 2009 and then some).

PS. Should anyone be interested in peace matters (this issue seems to have been overshadowed by all the political nonsense and personal opportunism), global military expenditure for 2008  was 1,470,000,000,000 USD.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_military_expenditures

 

Peace to all!

US President Obama awarded the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize

It’s just been made official that president Obama has been awarded the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize.
Will Smith was already made host of the Peace Prize show prior to the nomination.
more:

*Norwegian News in English
*PRIO: International Peace Research Institute, Norway (Civilian organisation, not connected with the Nobel committee).
* Right Livelihood Award an alternative to the Nobel Peace Prize, made necessary after the will of Alfred Nobel was perverted by the establishment to protect the establishment. 
*Fredrik Heffermehl’s correction of the Nobel Peace Prize committee.