Honda’s Top Gear lawnmover does 130mph – Stig goes domestic

How cool is that:

The vehicle, made by Honda for Top Gear magazine, goes from 0-60mph (95km/h) in roughly four seconds.

The team behind it may attempt to have an official go at the lawnmower speed record, which stands at 96.5mph.

In a test run, Top Gear magazine clocked “just over 100mph” on the back straight of the Circuit de Charade testing course in France.

Honda Top Gear lawnmover driven by The Stig

Honda Top Gear lawnmover driven by The Stig

The lawnmower was also put through its paces by Top Gear’s “the Stig”.

The British Lawn Mower Racing Association said Top Gear’s mower would not be able to compete in July’s World Championships because of strict limits on the number of modifications entrants can make to their bodies, lol.

read more here and here

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Cyber Monday Deals 2012 – Where are thou?

Is it just me, or are all of you others too noticing how difficult it is to find good web sites these days that actually have the content you’re looking for? Cyber Monday is a great example.
Searching the web today on Monday, it’s difficult to find webpages who’s result actually matches your query. I get the feeling I’m missing out on a lot of great deals today because of it.

Kindle Fire Cyber Monday Tablet Deal

OK, so it’s pretty awesome that the Kindle Fire finally have a Cyber Monday sale too.
See list of all other Cyber Monday Tablet Deals 2012 too, but where are the other great lists? Do I have to start using Bing now over Google, lol?
Or maybe I should have a go at that duckduckgo, yikes!

Patent Law needs to be changed?

This article in NY Times was intriguing, so I thought I’d post an exercept of it here:

In Silicon Valley, Apple just won big against Samsung in the patent lawsuit of the year, after trading claims and counterclaims of pilfered product ideas. Across the country, in a federal court in Florida, an inventor named Mark Stadnyk is waging a different kind of patent warfare — an ambitious and perhaps quixotic legal foray.

Mr. Stadnyk, who holds a patent on a motorcycle windshield, is suing the United States government, aiming to head off a patent law that he says will favor big companies and hurt lone inventors like himself.

Represented by a prominent Washington lawyer, Mr. Stadnyk filed a suit last month that challenges the constitutionality of legislation that Congress passed last fall, the America Invents Act. Mr. Stadnyk and his lawyer — along with some academics, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists — assert that the legislation is a triumph of corporate lobbying power over the founders’ wishes, and that it threatens America’s stature as the world’s leading innovator.

The present system, one of the nation’s oldest patent principles and called “first to invent,” relies on lab notebooks, e-mails and early prototypes to establish the date of invention. The impending law would overturn that by awarding patents to the inventors who are “first to file” with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

Mr. Stadnyk, 48, a garage inventor who stumbled into the world of patents after he bought a powerful new motorcycle and wanted to avoid being battered by the wind when riding at 60 miles an hour, even with a windshield. He devised a system of brackets and gears to adjust the height and angle of the windshield and the gap between it and the motorcycle. With his system, he says, the rider feels a flutter of breeze instead of jolting winds and turbulence.

Mr. Stadnyk, who describes his invention style as “rough hacking with chunks of metal,” founded his company, MadStad Engineering, in 2006, and as sales picked up, he stopped working as a computer consultant to devote himself to the business.

Today, MadStad employs eight people, including Mr. Stadnyk and his wife, Patty. His adjustable windshield systems, priced from $100 to $320, are now used on dozens of makes and models of motorcycles, and are sold through dealers in Australia, Britain and Spain, as well as the United States. Yearly sales, he said, are more than $500,000 and growing briskly.

Mr. Stadnyk holds three patents, and he speaks of a patented idea as a uniquely human property right. “It came out of your mind,” he explained. “It’s not property you bought or inherited.”

Mr. Stadnyk became interested in the patent legislation as it proceeded. He says he studied the proposals and the law, read blogs and reached out to Washington lawyers and academics who raised the issue of its constitutionality. A grass-roots activist, he even made a couple of YouTube videos.

read more at NY Times….