Italian Sneezes Out Bullet After Being Shot – New Years Eve Italian Style

Italian Darco Sangermano shot in head - sneeze out bullet

Italian Darco Sangermano shot in head - sneeze out bullet

Darco Sangermano, 28, was hit by a stray bullet in front of his shocked girlfriend as they celebrated New Year’s Eve and he was immediately rushed to hospital.

While there and amazingly still conscious, labourer Darco sneezed out the .22 calibre bullet and told doctors that, apart from a strong headache, he felt no other pain.

The bullet entered the right side of his head, went through the muscle, broke the temporal bone, passed behind his eye through the socket, hit a bone in his nose and then lodged in his nostril before being sneezed out.

The incident happened in the southern city of Naples, which has a reputation for lively end-of-year celebrations involving revellers firing live ammunition.

Mr Sangermano was one of three people hit by bullets during festivities and one person was also killed after being hit by a stray round as he watched fireworks with his family in a suburb on the outskirts of the city.

After a check up, Mr Sangermano was discharged from hospital and allowed to return home to Turin with his girlfriend, where his doctor recommended surgery to check the wound.

Professor Sid Berrone carried out a “tidy up operation”, at Turin’s Molinette hospital, on his nose to remove the bone fragments. Mr Sangermano was then discharged.

Professor Berrone said:”He was a very lucky man, he could have been easily killed.

“The bullet went through his temple, behind his eye, entered the nasal cavity and then became lodged in his nostril before he sneezed it out. Amazing.

“He needed surgery just to clean up the wound and get rid of the bone fragments, but other than that he was fine and we expect him to make a full recovery, he won’t even lose the sight of his eye”

Mammoth cloning possible in 4 years – Mammoth babies coming

The woolly mammoth, extinct for thousands of years, could be brought back to life in as little as four years because of bored self-involved scientists looking for something to do that will make them rich and famous.

Mammoth cloning possible in 4 years

Mammoth cloning possible in 4 years

Previous efforts in the 1990s to recover nuclei in cells from the skin and muscle tissue from mammoths found in the Siberian permafrost failed because they had been too badly damaged by the extreme cold.

But a technique pioneered in 2008 by Dr. Teruhiko Wakayama, of the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, was successful in cloning a mouse from the cells of another mouse that had been frozen for 16 years.

Now that hurdle has been overcome, Akira Iritani, a professor at Kyoto University, is reactivating his campaign to resurrect the species that died out 5,000 years ago.

“Now the technical problems have been overcome, all we need is a good sample of soft tissue from a frozen mammoth,” he told The Daily Telegraph.

He intends to use Dr Wakayama’s technique to identify the nuclei of viable mammoth cells before extracting the healthy ones.

The nuclei will then be inserted into the egg cells of an African elephant, which will act as the surrogate mother for the mammoth.

Professor Iritani said he estimates that another two years will be needed before the elephant can be impregnated, followed by the approximately 600-day gestation period.

He has announced plans to travel to Siberia in the summer to search for mammoths in the permafrost and to recover a sample of skin or tissue that can be as small as 3cm square. If he is unsuccessful, the professor said, he will ask Russian scientists to provide a sample from one of their finds.

“The success rate in the cloning of cattle was poor until recently but now stands at about 30 per cent,” he said. “I think we have a reasonable chance of success and a healthy mammoth could be born in four or five years.”